Tag Archives: Zach Hunt

Milliman Webinar: Seven key challenges for Medicaid states considering alternative payment models

There are a variety of reasons why alternative payment models (APMs) can be more difficult to implement and manage in Medicaid, compared to the commercial or Medicare markets. Understanding these nuances and building strategies to address them is critical to the success of Medicaid APMs. An upcoming Milliman webinar hosted by Anders Larson, Rebecca Johnson, and Zach Hunt will focus on the challenges Medicaid payers face when attempting to establish APMs with providers. The webinar is based on their coauthored paper “Seven key challenges for Medicaid states considering alternative payment models.”

Title: Seven key challenges for Medicaid states considering alternative payment models
Date: Wednesday, February 27, 2019
Time: 2:00 p.m. EST

To register, click here.

How can Medicaid states considering alternative payment models address challenges?

While the use of alternative payment models (APMs) in the Medicare and commercial markets is prevalent, the use of APMs in the Medicaid market is low. There are several reasons why these models are more difficult to implement in Medicaid. Understanding the nuances of Medicaid APMs and building strategies to address them is critical to their success.

In this paper, Milliman’s Anders Larson, Rebecca Johnson, and Zach Hunt discuss seven key challenges that Medicaid payers face when trying to establish APMs with providers. The paper specifically focuses on shared savings/risk contracts based on total cost of care (TCOC) models. The following excerpt provides some perspective.

One challenge with any total cost of care model is that providers inherently take on some level of insurance risk due to random claims fluctuation that can influence results. This is true in the Medicare ACO models, which is why CMS uses a minimum savings rate (MSR) that varies by population size to limit its payments for “false positives.” This is likely to be more pronounced in Medicaid because of challenges with attribution, beneficiaries moving in and out of Medicaid, and a higher prevalence of zero-dollar claimants.