Tag Archives: PPACA

What must issuers of pediatric dental benefits consider with AV ranges gone?

The draft Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2019 was published in October 2017. In this rule, there is a significant change affecting dental benefit plans—removing Actuarial Value (AV) requirements for Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)-compliant standalone pediatric dental plans. This change in policy provides new flexibility for dental issuers and closer alignment of pediatric dental benefits between standalone dental plans and pediatric coverage embedded within an ACA medical plan.

In this paper, Milliman consultant Joanne Fontana discusses this change and why it will be critical for dental issuers to understand and act on as the 2019 pricing cycle starts.

Increasing ACA plan premiums show that age is not just a number

In 2018, the federal age curve of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is changing for the first time. As a result, ACA premiums for individuals under 21 years of age will increase. It is important for health insurers to develop a communications plan that will explain to members why their premiums are increasing.

In their article “Are health carriers ready to explain the 2018 age curve?,” Milliman’s Amy Giese and Nicholas Krienke outline the ways carriers can communicate with members. The authors also discuss some underlying issues carriers must consider to effectively communicate the age curve’s effect on premiums.

Selling insurance across state lines: Intended and unintended consequences

Proponents believe that selling insurance across state lines without being subject to state-specific regulations would increase competition and lower insurance costs. This proposed change could result in critical intended and unintended consequences, which depend greatly on policy intent and design. Milliman consultant Susan Philip provides some perspective in this article.

The old and the beautiful: How age and gender affect costs and premiums in commercial healthcare

We generally consider living a long life an important goal, and it certainly does beat the alternative. But one side effect of getting older is that, as we age, we typically acquire additional acute and chronic medical conditions, and the prevalence of many common chronic medical conditions increases significantly. Age/gender rating is an area in which actuarial considerations are often in direct tension with social or public policy considerations: there is a natural tension between the policy goals of making coverage more affordable for older people (with higher average costs) and the goal of encouraging younger people (with lower average costs) to purchase health insurance coverage.

In an article first published in the magazine The Actuary, Milliman consultants Doug Norris, Hans Leida, Erica Rode, and Travis (T.J.) Gray explore how age and gender affect costs and premiums in commercial healthcare.

How do cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies affect your state?

The fate of the CSR subsidies in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)—or rather, whether they’ll continue to be federally funded—is a highly anticipated decision for healthcare stakeholders nationwide. Cost-sharing reduction subsidies are payments made to insurers that reduce copays and deductibles for qualifying individuals and families earning up to 250% of the federal poverty level (FPL) who purchase health insurance through the insurance marketplaces. Their government funding is currently under legal challenge, awaiting the White House’s decision whether or not to drop the House v. Price lawsuit.

Recently, Politico.com reported that Republicans are inching closer to a decision regarding the fate of CSR funding. As this decision will affect healthcare stakeholders in every state, it is important for policymakers to understand the health and stability of the individual market and how subsidies have affected health insurance consumers. Recently, my colleagues and I at Milliman prepared a profile of the individual health insurance market for each state along with the District of Columbia. The profile summarizes insurer financials, marketplace enrollment, and federal assistance provided to households purchasing insurance coverage through the insurance marketplaces.

We’ve compiled some of our 2017 data into an infographic that takes a closer look at ACA cost-sharing subsidies to enable stakeholders to better understand the population currently receiving assistance and the amount of assistance being provided. The graphic looks at two metrics: the estimated average annual CSR subsidy per qualifying individual and the number of individuals receiving CSRs by state in 2017. Results below provide a clearer picture of which states’ populations more heavily rely on CSR subsidies and by how much. Florida has the largest number of CSR recipients of any state, with approximately 1 million recipients in 2017. On a national level, we estimate that there are 5.7 million individuals covered by CSR subsidies nationally, and the sum of federal CSR expenditures will exceed $5.8 billion in CY 2017.

Cost-sharing reduction

More data and analysis can be found at Milliman.com/hcr.

This blog post first appeared on LinkedIn.

Overview of reinsurance and high-risk pools in the individual market

While there is significant uncertainty regarding current healthcare reform legislation, reinsurance and high-risk pool (HRP) programs are likely to play a role in attempting to stabilize individual market enrollment and premiums. In this paper, Milliman consultants Fritz Busch and Paul Houchens examine the following issues related to reinsurance and HRPs.

• The historical uses of HRPs prior to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)
• The role of reinsurance under the ACA, including emerging state-based programs developed using Section 1332 State Innovation Waivers
• The proposed usage of reinsurance and HRP under the American Health Care Act (AHCA), as passed by the House on May 4, 2017
• Considerations for states that are examining the creation and deployment of these types of mechanisms