Tag Archives: pharmacy benefit manager

Pharmacy benefits: Carve-in or carve-out?

Employers and other plan sponsors have the option of carving in or carving out their pharmacy benefit program from their medical benefits. There are a number of important factors that should be considered when deciding whether or not to carve out pharmacy benefits. This article identifies the advantages and disadvantages of both options and raises important questions to consider when contemplating a move to carve-out.

Definitions
Carved-in

When the pharmacy carve-in approach is used, the employer contracts directly with the medical health plan vendor for medical and pharmacy benefits. The vendor will either administer the program in-house or contract with a pharmacy benefits manager (PBM) vendor to process pharmacy claims and administer the pharmacy program. Because the employer contracts directly with the medical health plan vendor, there is no direct relationship with the PBM.

A pharmacy carve-in is typically used under the fully insured model. In 2015, the Pharmacy Benefit Management Institute (PBMI) reported 23% of smaller employers (less than 5,000 lives) and 7% of larger employers (greater than 5,000 lives) were fully insured. Under the fully insured model, the employer pays a premium to the insurer and the insurer assumes the risk of the total claims amount rather than the employer.

Carve-out
When the pharmacy carve-out approached is used, employers contract directly with a PBM vendor to administer their pharmacy benefits program.

A pharmacy carve-out is typically used under the self-insured model. In 2015, PBMI reported 77% of smaller employers and 93% of larger employers were self-insured. Under the self-insured model, the employer assumes the risk and benefits from managing costs. Pharmacy stop-loss insurance may be purchased to mitigate the risk of total claims amounts going over a certain threshold. A pharmacy carve-out can also be used with the fully insured model, although this is less common.

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Vetting PBM contract provisions may lower pharmacy plan costs

Prescription drug plan sponsors must consistently evaluate and update their pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) contracts to control costs. In their article “Medicare Part D PBM contracting strategy,” Milliman actuaries Michael Polakowski, Nicholas Johnson, and Todd Wanta highlight numerous contract provisions that plan sponsors should examine and renegotiate to reduce pharmacy expenses.

Here’s an excerpt:

As contracting has become more complex, the following contract provisions are becoming more common as plan sponsors look to reduce their pharmacy expenses.

Price protection. In the current environment of high-cost trends for brand-name drugs, price protection can offer more inflation protection than discount guarantees. Any price increases above a predefined threshold are paid back to the PBM by the manufacturer and considered rebates by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Plan sponsors should carefully consider how price protection can affect Medicare bids and end-of-year settlements.
Membership. More favorable dispensing fees, discounts, and/or rebates may be achieved for plan sponsors with higher membership counts. Improved contracting levels are specified directly in the PBM contract.
Discount/rebate guarantees. Discount and rebate guarantees may be presented in many different forms, e.g., rebates per brand-name script or on a per member per month (PMPM) basis, or discounts off AWP or the maximum allowable cost (MAC) list. Rebate guarantees may exclude certain drugs. At a minimum, plan sponsors should ensure the targets are clearly understood and auditable. Plan sponsors should be wary of proprietary definitions when industry definitions are available for reference. Plan sponsors should also ensure that reimbursement mechanisms are in place if targets are not achieved.
Rebate maximization. Because of the structure of the Part D benefit, rebates can be a more effective way to reduce Medicare bids than discounts. Over the last few years (and with the increasing cost of specialty drugs), plan sponsors have increasingly negotiated with PBMs to maximize rebates rather than discounts. The financial incentives for this approach are discussed by Milliman consultants Adam Barnhart and Jason Gomberg in a recent article for the AIDS Institute, “Financial Incentives in Medicare Part D.”1
Multi-year agreements. Some PBMs have been willing to provide discount or rebate improvements over time if plan sponsors commit to multi-year contracts. Plan sponsors should be sure to verify that the improvements are contractually guaranteed and meet or beat market-wide improvements. Even multi-year discounts should have market check provisions to allow plan sponsors the ability to receive better terms when the market changes.

To carve in, or to carve out, that is the question

Employers and other plan sponsors have the option of carving in or carving out their pharmacy benefit program from their medical benefits. In this paper, Milliman’s Brian Anderson and Angela Reed highlight the advantages and disadvantages of both options and raise important questions to consider when contemplating a move to carve out.

Assessing PBM contracts with a basic ABC strategy

Plan sponsors can garner greater value from their pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) by routinely assessing their contractual terms and the PBM’s performance. The ABCs—auditing, benchmarking, and competitive bidding—of PBM contract assessment are key to delivering competitive pharmacy benefits on a cost-effective basis. In this article, Milliman’s Andrea Sheldon and Michelle Angeloni describe each of the three functions encompassing an ABC pharmacy benefit strategy.

Structuring a PBM vendor process to reduce costs

Plan sponsors who routinely review the selection and contracting process they use to hire a pharmacy benefits manager (PBM) can cut costs. An experienced consultant can help by customizing the process to meet the plan sponsor’s needs and provide critical assistance throughout the process. Milliman’s Brian Anderson and Alex Johnson offer some perspective in the article “Staying competitive in the pharmacy benefits manager selection process.” The authors also provide an overview of PBM contract negotiations and market checks.

Here’s an excerpt:

When selecting a PBM, a plan sponsor should follow a well-structured RFP process. It is imperative that the process involves individuals with extensive experience and knowledge in reviewing, implementing, managing, and auditing PBM arrangements. Their experience will play an important role in achieving the best available PBM arrangement for the plan sponsor, including optimal financial terms and concise contractual language.

Most plan sponsors partner with a pharmacy benefits consultant to guide them through the process and help them achieve the best results. It is vital to develop a proven, objective, and tailored grading process to evaluate the PBM vendor responses and make valid financial and administrative comparisons across vendors. An experienced consultant or advisor can help in this regard.

The steps required in the PBM vendor selection process include:

• Preparing the RFP
• Distributing the RFP to prospective PBMs
• Conducting a bidders’ conference call
• Analyzing financial bids and grading responses
• Summarizing analysis and choosing finalists
• Finalizing PBM selection
• Drafting the contract

Medicare Part D member profitability by pharmacy channel

Preferred networks have become the norm in the Medicare Part D landscape. Members typically have a lower cost-sharing requirement when they use a pharmacy in the preferred network. Preferred pharmacies expect to receive a greater share of the carrier’s business and provide the carrier with greater discounts or direct/indirect remuneration (DIR). In this research paper, Milliman’s Jason Gomberg and Michael Hunter analyze 2014 Part D plan profitability to determine if specific pharmacy channels are associated with members that may be more or less profitable for a Medicare Part D carrier.