Tag Archives: paid family leave

Infographic: Paid family leave requirements by state

Lobbyists and lawmakers across four states—Hawaii, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Colorado—are considering paid family leave bills, with Connecticut’s legislation awaiting only a floor vote. If passed, the state would join California, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and New York in offering paid family leave benefits to its workers; Washington state and the District of Columbia will begin offering benefits in 2020.

Of those that offer benefits, the details of each paid family leave program vary from state to state. This infographic summarizes paid family leave requirements that employers must consider when adding these benefits to their health and welfare programs. To learn more, read Marcella Giorgou’s article “Paid family leave gaining traction in the United States.”

Paid family leave gaining traction in the United States

Beginning January 1, 2018, New York joined three other states to offer paid family leave in the United States. California, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and now New York all offer paid family leave programs funded through employee contributions. Washington state will begin offering paid family leave in 2020, funded through a combination of employer and employee contributions. Washington, D.C., will begin offering paid family leave in 2020 through employer contributions.

As more states implement paid family leave programs and the federal government continues to discuss it, paid family leave benefits as part of health and welfare programs have gained traction. Almost 60% of U.S. employers offer or are planning to offer paid leave in 2018 for new parents, and just under 50% offer or are planning to offer paid leave in 2018 to care for a sick family member.

Details of paid family leave programs vary from state to state. Employers with employees in multiple states need to navigate these different requirements in designing their programs. A summary of paid family leave requirements by state is shown in Figure 1.

In addition to the difference in benefits summarized above, details such as eligibility, waiting periods, and qualifying events, as well as how the benefits are delivered, differ from state to state. Most states provide the benefits through a state fund, although some allow for private insurers to participate in paid family leave, such as New York and New Jersey. New York also allows employers to self-insure their benefits.

As governments and employers (where self-insuring is an option) consider the cost of paid family leave programs, it is important for them to consider the following:

  • There is limited data available with regard to utilization of paid family leave benefits.
    • Although there is experience with respect to other paid family leave programs offered in states such as New Jersey it is important to adjust for differences in design and demographics of individual groups.
    • It is also important to consider disability claims related to maternity, as bonding with a newborn is generally where a majority of employees utilize paid family leave benefits. In New Jersey, approximately 85% of claims are for bonding with newborn children.
  • There will be administrative costs associated with the program.
  • Employers who self-insure in New York are required to hold a minimum security deposit to fund unexpected losses, which is determined at the employer level using assumptions prescribed by the New York Department of Financial Services (DFS). Also, the employers are required to submit their experience with DFS on an annual basis.

Some states and employers have taken the lead in implementing paid family leave programs in 2018. As others consider implementing paid family leave it is not only important to consider the cost of the program, but also the design, delivery, and funding. All of them are important to an employer’s leave management strategy.

This article first appeared in the March 2018 issue of Health and Group Benefits News and Developments.

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Paid family leave proposal leaves states with funding issues to consider

President Donald Trump’s 2018 budget proposal includes a paid family leave insurance program for workers in the United States. Under the president’s proposal, states would be allowed to design the paid leave program for their own jurisdictions as long as the benefits meet minimum standards. This means that some states may have a lot to consider when preparing for a new insurance program, such as funding methods, administration, and specific benefit design features. The article “Paid family leave in the United States” by Paul Correia offers some perspective.