Tag Archives: medical loss ratio

Medicaid managed care market penetration quadruples over past decade

Milliman has announced the availability of its annual research into the financial results and administrative expenses associated with Medicaid managed care plans. This year’s report marks the tenth edition of Milliman’s research, and combines the financial and administrative analysis into one comprehensive report including an in-depth examination of Medicaid managed care plans’ medical loss ratios (MLR), administrative loss ratios (ALR), underwriting ratios (UW ratio), and RBC ratios. The information is of significant value to the Medicaid industry as enrollment and revenue continue to increase year-over-year.

Observing the changes that have occurred in the Medicaid managed care landscape over the last ten years provides valuable insight into the makeup of the market. We have made enhancements to this year’s report that help to highlight the growth in this industry and the ebb and flow of experience over time.

Key findings from the analysis include:

• The average underwriting gain of 0.9% in calendar year (CY) 2017 remained relatively stable from the composite gains observed in CY 2016.
• During the past ten years of our analysis, the data studied for the report has seen a 250% growth in membership and over 400% growth in revenue for the studied Medicaid managed care programs
• Administrative expenses continue to increase on a per member per month basis, but decrease as a percentage of revenue has been observed from CY 2016 to CY 2017.

To see the Medicaid administrative expenses report, click here.

Transitional policies result in higher medical loss ratios

A new Milliman analysis shows that the percentage of transitional policy members in a state’s health exchange market appears to correlate with higher medical loss ratios. In the analysis, Milliman consultants Erik Huth and Jason Karcher quantify the effect that transitional policies had on issuers’ 2014 individual market performances and how it may result in 2017 rate increases for transitional states.

Here’s an excerpt:

The table in Figure 3 shows that issuers in transitional states had higher 2014 loss ratios but appear to not have taken large enough 2015 and 2016 rate increases to achieve profitable 2016 loss ratios (assuming 2014 to 2016 significant cost savings are not realized in other ways). Although issuers’ 2017 rate increases will reflect their 2015 experience and updated projections, there is potential for transitional states to see higher rate increases in 2017.

Figure 3

The graph in Figure 4 shows the 2014 ACA loss ratio and the average 2014 to 2016 statewide QHP base rate change for each state. The gray line represents an illustrative 2014 to 2016 rate increase needed to target an 85% 2016 loss ratio given the 2014 loss ratio and assuming a 5% annual claim trend. For example, a state with an 85% 2014 loss ratio would require a 10.25% 2014 to 2016 rate increase to target an 85% 2016 loss ratio (i.e., 5% annual rate increases to cover the 5% annual claim trend to maintain the 85% loss ratio). States well underneath the line indicate a possible need for higher 2017 increases than states closer to the line. Keep in mind that projected 2016 loss ratios are merely illustrative. There are many factors that will affect a state’s overall 2016 loss ratio and required 2016 and 2017 rate increases, such as, but not limited to, changes in experience and statewide morbidity levels, wear-off of pent-up demand, provider contracting, claim trends, population migration and characteristics, and product and issuer mix. These values also represent a statewide composite, while specific issuers could have materially different results than the average.

Figure 4

“Mega Reg” rule mandates MLRs for Medicaid managed care programs

The Medicaid “Mega Reg” final rule now makes medical loss ratios (MLRs) a requirement for Medicaid managed care programs in every state. While the Medicaid MLR formula largely follows the commercial and Medicare Advantage formula, there are some key differences between the three. In this report, Milliman consultants discuss several issues that state agencies and managed care organizations need to consider in the development and completion of MLR reporting.

Insurers have a new MLR formula to learn

Medicare Advantage (MA) carriers must file medical loss ratio (MLR) reports with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) by December 4. Commercial carriers that also offer MA or prescription drug plans (PDPs) may already have experience reporting MLR requirements, but differences exist in the MA/PDP formula that carriers need to know about. Milliman consultant Courtney White offers some perspective in his article “The Medicare Advantage medical loss ratio requirement.”

The importance of administrative cost benchmarking

In the late 1990s, online travel agencies revolutionized the airline industry by publishing fares and allowing consumers to search for and purchase tickets. No longer would consumers have to rely on an agent to filter and present options; travelers could search across all vendors and use their own criteria to evaluate their options and purchase a ticket. The individual and small group health insurance markets are poised for the same sort of dramatic change, driven by the now familiar concept of the online marketplace, known in the health insurance industry as the exchange.

Although the operation of a health insurance exchange is quite different from that of an online travel agency, these distribution channels are similar in their impact on price transparency. Under the old travel agent model, consumers would first search for tickets based on convenience factors (e.g., travel dates and times, routes, etc.) and then use price to differentiate among a few options. Likewise, in the individual and small group health insurance markets, price is often presented after the purchaser has already narrowed the options to a few that meet non-price criteria. In both of these situations, price is applied as a deciding factor after the consumer has already narrowed the universe of choices to a subset of similarly appealing options; and the consumer lacks visibility to the prices of choices that were eliminated in that process. Online markets, on the other hand, allow consumers to see the prices of all or most options at the same time, making price a primary determining factor when making a purchase decision. This new presentation format, which allows consumers to choose one product over another based on a small dollar price difference, discourages significant price variation among competitors for similar products.

For most health insurance products, price is comprised of three primary components: benefit expense, administrative expense, and risk margin. Although benefit expense makes up the lion’s share of the premium or price, administrative cost differentials among health insurers can also materially contribute to premium differences. These differences will become more pronounced and may affect consumer purchasing decisions as the benefit expense component of premium is constrained by the medical loss ratio (MLR) requirements of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). These rules effectively create a benefit expense floor, requiring that health insurers in the individual and small group markets spend no less than 80% of premium on benefits (85% in the large group market), or pay a rebate to policyholders. It is likely that MLRs for individual and small group products will eventually settle around the 80% level or higher. In this new world, the importance of managing administrative cost will increase as price competition puts pressure on overall premiums and the MLR rules force administrative cost and risk margin into a fixed share of the premium dollar.

Benchmarking is one of the most effective tools available to help health insurers manage administrative expense. For insurers working to achieve MLR targets through administrative cost reduction, a benchmarking assessment can offer a function-by-function comparison of administrative expenses and staffing levels versus competitors and peers. Such an analysis can help organizations figure out where to target their cost reduction initiatives or determine what cost level is appropriate for a given department, cost center, or function.

For insurers that have already achieved the MLR targets, administrative benchmarks combined with a dashboard view can allow for monitoring of administrative expense variation throughout the year. Optimizing administrative cost is not something that can be achieved overnight; it takes time to plan and implement cost management initiatives, and months or years before the benefits accrue to the bottom line. Thus a dashboard coupled with benchmarks can provide management the tools they need to effectively manage their price competitiveness in this new distribution paradigm.

This article first appeared at Milliman MedInsight.

CCIIO releases memo providing MLR guidance

The Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight (CCIIO) has published a new two-page memo entitled “Questions and Answers Regarding the Medical Loss Ratio Reporting and Rebate Requirements,” providing medical loss ratio (MLR) guidance on the following topics:

  • Notice of Rebate
  • Notice of MLR Information
  • Definition of Plan Document

 
Read the entire bulletin here.