Tag Archives: CSR subsidy

Risk adjustment modifications in view of potential CSR subsidy termination

If the cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) were eliminated, it could expose insurance carriers to a substantial increase in selection risk related to their particular mixes of business. In August, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced its intention to propose a set of risk adjustment modifications for states in which insurance carriers raise silver premiums in response to potential CSR subsidy termination.

In this paper, Milliman’s Jeffrey Milton-Hall, Doug Norris, and Jason Karcher explore the CMS proposal along with the current ACA risk adjustment program and three other potential alternative modifications to risk adjustment in response to the possible elimination of CSR funding.

How do cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies affect your state?

The fate of the CSR subsidies in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA)—or rather, whether they’ll continue to be federally funded—is a highly anticipated decision for healthcare stakeholders nationwide. Cost-sharing reduction subsidies are payments made to insurers that reduce copays and deductibles for qualifying individuals and families earning up to 250% of the federal poverty level (FPL) who purchase health insurance through the insurance marketplaces. Their government funding is currently under legal challenge, awaiting the White House’s decision whether or not to drop the House v. Price lawsuit.

Recently, Politico.com reported that Republicans are inching closer to a decision regarding the fate of CSR funding. As this decision will affect healthcare stakeholders in every state, it is important for policymakers to understand the health and stability of the individual market and how subsidies have affected health insurance consumers. Recently, my colleagues and I at Milliman prepared a profile of the individual health insurance market for each state along with the District of Columbia. The profile summarizes insurer financials, marketplace enrollment, and federal assistance provided to households purchasing insurance coverage through the insurance marketplaces.

We’ve compiled some of our 2017 data into an infographic that takes a closer look at ACA cost-sharing subsidies to enable stakeholders to better understand the population currently receiving assistance and the amount of assistance being provided. The graphic looks at two metrics: the estimated average annual CSR subsidy per qualifying individual and the number of individuals receiving CSRs by state in 2017. Results below provide a clearer picture of which states’ populations more heavily rely on CSR subsidies and by how much. Florida has the largest number of CSR recipients of any state, with approximately 1 million recipients in 2017. On a national level, we estimate that there are 5.7 million individuals covered by CSR subsidies nationally, and the sum of federal CSR expenditures will exceed $5.8 billion in CY 2017.

Cost-sharing reduction

More data and analysis can be found at Milliman.com/hcr.

This blog post first appeared on LinkedIn.

Affordable Care Act subsidies: How does your state benefit?

How much does your state benefit from Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) subsidies?

Milliman’s recently published 50-state profile of the individual health insurance market presents nationwide enrollment and subsidy data that can help states better understand the funding and coverage requirements under the ACA. The infographic below sheds light on some of the 2017 results, including marketplace enrollment numbers by state, and a closer look at the ACA cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies—for which government funding is currently under legal challenge.

Exploring the future of CSR subsidies

The potential nonpayment of cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies to health insurers, as required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), could create instability in the individual market. Issuers are now contemplating their exchange participation plans for 2018, and the future of cost-sharing reductions will play a key role in their decisions. This report by Milliman’s Pedro Alcocer, Frederick Busch, and Jason Karcher explores the possible legislative and regulatory outcomes and potential issuer responses.

Substantial amount of ACA plans’ revenue comes from cost-sharing payments

Politico Pulse cited a new study performed by Milliman that examines cost-sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The study was commissioned by the Association for Community Affiliated Plans.

Here’s the excerpt from the morning briefing:

FIRST IN PULSE: COST-SHARING SUBSIDIES ARE A SIGNIFICANT SHARE OF OBAMACARE REVENUES — Cost-sharing subsidies accounted for 7.8 percent of health plan revenues for customers enrolled in Obamacare plans in 2015, according to a new study commissioned by the Association for Community Affiliated Plans.

The study conducted by Milliman also found a huge discrepancy between states that expanded Medicaid and those that didn’t. Cost-sharing subsidies accounted for 4.8 percent of revenues in expansions states, but that share more than doubled in states that didn’t expand coverage. The amount of money at stake: $4.9 billion in assistance to 5.2 million exchange customers in 2015.

Why it matters: The future of the cost-sharing subsidies is in limbo. House Republicans sued to block the funding and won an initial court battle. But they’re being pushed by health plans to continue the payments now that they’re in control of the federal government. Otherwise, insurers warn, the Obamacare markets could collapse on their watch. “The loss of CSR payments in 2017 would trigger significant losses for many insurers in the individual market,” the study concludes. Read the report here.

Cost-sharing reduction payment implications

In their article “CSR subsidies: Intra-year emergence,” Milliman’s Aaron Wright and Shyam Kolli assess the difference between prospective payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CSM) and actual cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments. They also discuss the effects that payments may have on quarterly financial statements for some carriers.