Questions and answers: Are you managing retiree health needs cost-effectively?

Because retirees are often the highest users of healthcare, simple changes in plan design or delivery can go a long way in reducing costs for employers. For example, we had a client that was looking to deliver benefits to its Medicare retirees more efficiently. By moving the entire population to a Medicare Advantage plan, our client not only reduced its retiree medical costs by 10% in the first year due to a reduced premium, but it also was able to provide a richer benefit design.

In reviewing your own retiree medical benefit design strategy, here are a few questions you should ask.

Is my plan coordinating with Medicare in the most efficient way?
If you have an active medical plan that also covers Medicare-eligible retirees, carefully review the coordination of benefits method. When Medicare is primary, the plan commonly coordinates under one of these approaches: carve-out, maintenance of benefits, or coordination of benefits. Because costs to the plan and retiree vary under each of these approaches it is a good idea to examine each one; there may be a way to save money for the plan or the retiree.

Am I taking full advantage of prescription drug subsidies?
Given the high use of prescription drugs in the retiree population, this area may be your best opportunity to reduce costs. Are you taking full advantage of the prescription drug subsidies from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)? Consider delivering Medicare prescription drug coverage through an employer group waiver plan or with retiree drug subsidy coverage.

Am I leveraging the experts in administration?
Some companies have moved Medicare-eligible retirees to a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug Plan (MAPDP), which offers additional benefits beyond Part A and Part B coverage. The federal government pays private insurance companies to offer these plans. Because MAPDPs are fully insured, the insurer would take over the entire administration of the Medicare plan and is well-versed in managing this population, resulting in possible savings and increased efficiencies in plan administration.

Does a pre-Medicare plan make sense?
If the size of your pre-Medicare retiree population is large enough, the most cost-effective solution could be to offer a pre-Medicare retiree-only plan. Retiree populations are different and a pre-Medicare retiree-only plan can be designed with those needs in mind, in a way that efficiently maximizes benefits. For example, retirees are generally on fixed incomes, so a plan designed with set deductibles, copayments, and out-of-pocket maximums is more desirable.

Am I using all the utilization management tools available?
Utilization management programs can be helpful in reducing the cost of covering pre-Medicare retirees. For example, chronic diseases are likely more prevalent in your pre-Medicare retirees than your actives. Helping retirees manage these conditions can benefit not just your covered population but also your bottom line.

Do any of the plan changes that I am making have unintended consequences for my retiree population?
Seemingly small changes can have significant financial impacts for your organization when you look closely at how it affects your retirees—even though retirees likely make up a smaller portion of your total population. For example, for plans that receive the retiree drug subsidy, changes that increase cost sharing or contributions for prescription drugs for retirees may cause the plan to lose eligibility for the subsidy. Instead of cost-shifting, it may make more sense to focus on managing plan costs. You will have the added advantage of possibly lowering retiree medical accounting liabilities—e.g., Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Subtopic 715-60 liability—by potentially reducing projected plan costs, long-term trend, and delaying the impact of the 40% excise tax on high-cost health plans.

When it comes to retiree medical coverage, it is important to ask the right questions. Given the increasing cost of healthcare and retirees’ high utilization, you may be able to make changes that positively affect your retirees and lower the cost of covering them.

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