Encounter data submission consideration for Medicare Advantage organizations

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is shifting to the Encounter Data System (EDS) as the sole basis for risk scores of Medicare Advantage organizations (MAOs). EDS data will have a substantial influence on risk scores and revenue as early as payment year (PY) 2016.

In this article, Milliman consultants offer perspective on several analyses MAOs should consider to prepare data submissions for CMS. The authors also discuss some challenges MAOs may face when verifying that the data submitted through the EDS are complete and accurate and that all appropriate diagnosis codes are being accepted for risk adjustment by CMS.

Here’s an excerpt:

To provide an effective review of an MAO’s diagnosis code submissions, the following analytics can be undertaken:

• Calculation of risk scores from each diagnosis source: RAPS, EDS, and source claims/ chart review data
• Plan-level and member-level comparisons of risk scores based on each diagnosis source
• Analysis of submission gaps
• Analysis of coding gaps

To perform the EDS submission review, a possible first step is to create a “plan report card,” which summarizes the risk scores under accepted RAPS and EDS submissions and the risk scores based on all diagnosis sources (claims and chart review data) after applying the MAO’s specific RAPS filtering logic and the EDS filtering logic released by CMS.

Figure 1 provides an example of a potential Plan Report Card for PY 2016 EDS submission review. In this example, there is a 4.1% gap between the EDS risk scores and the risk scores after the MAO applied the EDS filtering logic to the source claims data. Also, based on the CMS return data, the EDS risk scores are four points lower than the RAPS scores. This indicates that the EDS submissions may be incomplete and that there are diagnoses in the source claims data that the CMS filtering logic has rejected.

encounter-data-processing-system_figure-1

If submissions to CMS contain all necessary data elements to successfully pass the filtering logic, the risk scores based on RAPS and EDS return data should match the risk scores calculated from the source claims and chart review data. In addition, if the RAPS and EDS filtering logic are the same, the RAPS and EDS risk scores should also be the same. However, there can be gaps between what is submitted and accepted by CMS and the claims and chart review data because of:

• Incomplete data submissions (e.g., claims being inadvertently filtered out or dropped, missing chart review data)
• Inaccurate data submissions (e.g., the wrong medical codes, such as incorrect bill type, being used in the submissions)
• CMS system errors (e.g., failure to match diagnosis data with the correct member)
• Other potential process errors

Furthermore, comparison of the RAPS and EDS risk scores will indicate whether the MAO’s revenue is being adversely affected by the move from RAPS to EDS. A focused look at the MAO’s own coding practices as they compare to Medicare FFS coding standards and EDS filter criteria can identify the coding gaps that may drive lower risk scores under EDS.

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