Will the increase in the coinsurance rate offer insurers relief?

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently announced that the 2014 transitional reinsurance program’s coinsurance rate would be 100% rather than 80% as originally stated. This is good news for insurers in the health exchange’s individual market whose reimbursement requests will be paid in full (and then some). In this article, Milliman’s Daniel Perlman, Doug Norris, and Hans Leida discuss the financial implications this change could have on insurers.

For issuers of ACA-compliant plans in the individual market, the increased coinsurance has a fairly obvious direct positive impact on 2014 financial performance: more will be collected than many issuers likely assumed when preparing annual statements for 2014. Any issuer that had computed its transitional reinsurance recovery accruals at year-end 2014 based upon the originally announced coinsurance parameter will now receive an additional 25% (because 100% / 80% = 1.25) given the change in coinsurance. The impact of this change will vary significantly by insurer, but could be material in relation to overall individual ACA market claim costs for many insurers. It may not be uncommon to see reductions in net paid claims of 2% to 4% as a result of this change.

The CMS announcement suggests that the reimbursement requests made by insurance companies may be low enough that the transitional reinsurance program could pay 100% of the coinsurance rate and carry a surplus into 2015. The authors estimated that this surplus would be between $1 billion and $2 billion. In fact, based on new information released by CMS on June 30, 2015, it is now known that the surplus carried forward will be approximately $1.8 billion, in the range the authors predicted.

If, even after the increase in coinsurance, total payouts are less than the $9.7 billion in reinsurance assessments collected, there will be additional funds to roll forward into 2015. These additional funds could help create the same (or similar) outcome for the 2015 plan year by increasing the size of the reinsurance pool by any amount carried forward from 2014. (This could conceivably happen for the 2016 plan year as well, for similar reasons.)

Is there a surplus available to carry forward to 2015, and if so, how big is it? We don’t know for sure…however…[there may be] somewhere between $1 billion and $2 billion unspent.

…The bottom line is that there would be more money available to make reinsurance payments for the 2015 plan year. This is good news for issuers of ACA-compliant individual market plans. However, issuers should be cautious about relying on further enrichment in the 2015 program parameters, as (among other concerns) it is possible that the current parameters have already assumed some amount of carryover.

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