How can employers add incentive to a wellness program?

Health reform may create an opportunity for employers contemplating new or expanded wellness programs. In the latest issue of Benefits Perspectives, Sharon Stocker examines keys to creating a valuable program, with an emphasis on effective communications to ensure employee engagement and participation.

Here’s an excerpt:

1. Understand Your Audience
The goal of health promotion is behavior change, and reversing unhealthy habits that may have been built over many years is not easy. An effective change strategy calls for knowing your audience—what motivates them, potential obstacles, and tools they need for support.

Surveys and focus groups are a useful way to uncover what is most relevant for your employees and their families. (Involving family members is critical – dependent healthcare costs are a sizable factor.) Once the top areas of need and interest are clear, as well as potential barriers to participation, you can target strategies to address them.

Asking for opinions and input serves another important purpose – nurturing a sense of pride and ownership in the program. The most engaging communication is interactive, with ideas and information flowing both ways.

Be sure to clearly state survey/focus group objectives from the outset, letting employees know how the research will be used. You don’t want to imply sweeping changes unless that’s your intent. Acknowledge the value of their input and be serious about acting on the results—or risk having disgruntled employees.

2. Create and Promote a Brand That is Uniquely Yours
The best brands inspire recognition, enthusiasm, and loyalty. Once you have a positive, action-oriented campaign, branding it will help the program capture—and keep—people’s attention.

Your wellness program name and graphic look should align with and reflect the organization’s identity and values. You want to infuse the program with a sense of excitement so that people want to be a part of it. Engage employees and invite participation from the start by having a contest, with healthy prizes, to name the program.

A strong brand also conveys commitment, sending a message that the program is here to stay and worth attention as well as involvement.

To read the entire article, click here.