Category Archives: Affordability

Partnering with health microinsurers to increase Kenya’s healthcare coverage

Kenya’s public health insurance scheme—the National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF) provides much of the country’s health insurance. However, the percentage of citizens covered by the NHIF falls short of Kenya’s national goals related to healthcare access. One key way that the NHIF can improve participation rates is by partnering with health microinsurers (HMIs).

In his article “Benefits of public-private partnerships in health microinsurance: the Kenyan context,” Milliman’s Mitchell Momanyi provides an overview of the NHIF and the reasons for low participation in the program. He also outlines several ways it can work with HMIs to enhance its benefits and increase its health insurance coverage.

Here is an excerpt from the article:

HMIs offer simple and affordable benefits that, when paired with public schemes such as the NHIF, can encourage beneficiaries to participate in and use their public insurance benefits when necessary. An example of such a benefit offered by many HMIs is ‘hospital cash.’ Hospital cash pays a fixed amount of money to the beneficiary when a qualifying inpatient hospital stay is triggered. This money can be used to pay for costs related to seeking treatment such as transportation, food and partial replacement of lost income. These costs aren’t covered by the NHIF and would present a barrier to some individuals seeking treatment. The SAJIDA Foundation in Bangladesh and the Microfund for Women in Jordan are examples of organisations that have successfully launched hospital cash products.9

A second way in which the NHIF can increase its reach is by pairing its benefits with an HMI policy that provides value-added services. Examples of such services may include access to discounted medication and access to preventive services such as free health check-ups. Value-added services are included in some HMI policies in order to increase client value by making the benefits more tangible. Beneficiaries don’t have to wait for catastrophic events such as an inpatient admission in order to use their benefits. An example of an HMI that has successfully implemented value-added services is Uplift in India. Its ‘dial-a-doctor’ service is popular among beneficiaries.10

The government can also partner with HMIs in order to increase awareness of the NHIF programme. The Impact Insurance Facility describes the lack of awareness of public benefits as a key emerging lesson in Ghana. In discussing a field test conducted to gauge citizens’ awareness of the country’s National Health Insurance Scheme, the Facility states that the test group did not know about the costs and eligibility requirements of the programme. It went on to state that ‘this lack of understanding is an initial barrier to enrolment and a factor in low retention in the scheme – even with a government sponsored scheme intended to provide universal cover.’11 In order to distribute their products effectively, HMIs typically build valuable partnerships with entities such as local community groups, unions and cooperatives. The NHIF can leverage these partnerships in order to promote the programme effectively in remote areas that the government would otherwise be unable to reach.

Genetic testing in England: ROI, cost-effectiveness analysis, or both to evaluate intervention

In healthcare, return on investment (ROI) can be used to measure the effectiveness of various disease management programmes. ROI provides a framework to help determine whether additional funds should be allocated to a particular activity or alternatively whether these funds should be withdrawn and allocated elsewhere. The rapid uptake of genetic testing within the National Health Service (NHS) and current debate around genetics make evaluating tailored interventions increasingly more relevant to ensure an efficient use of NHS spend. Milliman’s Joanne Buckle and Didier Serre provide perspective in this paper.

The old and the beautiful: How age and gender affect costs and premiums in commercial healthcare

We generally consider living a long life an important goal, and it certainly does beat the alternative. But one side effect of getting older is that, as we age, we typically acquire additional acute and chronic medical conditions, and the prevalence of many common chronic medical conditions increases significantly. Age/gender rating is an area in which actuarial considerations are often in direct tension with social or public policy considerations: there is a natural tension between the policy goals of making coverage more affordable for older people (with higher average costs) and the goal of encouraging younger people (with lower average costs) to purchase health insurance coverage.

In an article first published in the magazine The Actuary, Milliman consultants Doug Norris, Hans Leida, Erica Rode, and Travis (T.J.) Gray explore how age and gender affect costs and premiums in commercial healthcare.

Preexisting conditions and the effects on health insurance

Solving the preexisting conditions issue is a significant hurdle in healthcare reform. Making health insurance available to individuals with preexisting conditions—while also ensuring affordability in a system in which health insurance is optional—has proven to be very challenging so far.

In this article, Milliman’s Tom Snook discusses why the coverage of preexisting conditions is a key issue in health insurance, particularly with respect to affordability and sustainability, and outlines varying approaches to addressing it.

Alternative payment models advancing telehealth use

Alternative payment models that incentivize value and improve population health management are a catalyst increasing telehealth’s acceptance. Employers also realize the potential cost-saving advantages of offering telehealth benefits under alternative payment models.

In her article “Telehealth under alternative payment models,” Milliman’s Susan Philip highlights some alternative payment models adopting telehealth services to improve the quality and delivery of care. In addition, she discusses how an assessment of these solutions can help organizations gauge their prospective returns on investment (ROI).

Here is an excerpt:

Cost savings and efficiency gains under alternative payment models will be driven by delivery system transformation and successful population health management initiatives. Telehealth has the potential to boost the impact of population health management initiatives while improving access and convenience of healthcare delivery.

Telehealth’s potential is not lost on investors and employers. In 2014, companies focused on telehealth technologies received about $285 million in venture capital funding, a substantial increase from less than $100 million in 2013.6 A recent employer survey indicated that about a third of employers expect to offer or are considering offering telemedicine consultations to employees as a low-cost alternative to emergency room or physician office visits for nonemergency health issues.7 The same survey found that telemedicine has the potential to deliver close to $6 billion in savings to U.S. companies.

Such high expectations must be calibrated. To conduct appropriate ROI evaluations, telehealth solutions and programs should be designed to consider the purpose of the solution. In general, we think of telehealth solutions for one of three primary purposes: improve access to specialty care, support care management, or provider nonemergency acute care services….

By design, telehealth programs intended to provide convenient access to a limited set of nonemergency, acute care services can be expected to increase the use of those services. Vendors such as Teledoc, American Well, or Doctors on Demand typically offer 24/7 video visits for common symptoms that may require consultation with an advance care practitioner or a physician. Examples include UTIs, skin issues and rashes, diarrhea and vomiting, and cold and flu symptoms such as sinusitis, or bronchitis. These services are not designed to substitute for an ongoing relationship with patients’ primary care providers but rather to provide an alternative to urgent care or ER visits for nonemergency conditions. Robust evaluations of the potential return on investment should consider whether services merely drive up total use and cost of healthcare for a given population, or whether the telehealth services successfully replace other, more costly services such as emergency care or urgent care visits.

Health insurers, purchasers, and investors will look to properly designed evaluations to assess return on investment and metrics related to utilization, costs, access, and quality of care.

For perspective on how telehealth technologies are being used within microinsurance schemes in sub-Saharan Africa and rural health clinics in California, read the article “m-Health: Remote access.”

Telehealth enhancing health microinsurance programs

In her article “m-Health: Remote access,” Milliman consultant Lisa Morgan discusses how mobile technologies, specifically telehealth services, are being used around the globe, from their incorporation into health microinsurance schemes in sub-Saharan Africa to rural health clinics in California, increasing provider reach.

Here is an excerpt:

There are many examples of telehealth in HMI [health microinsurance] schemes (typically telephone contact with a nurse or doctor).

‘Dial-a-doctor’ programmes are already reaching millions of members of large HMI schemes, as shown in Tables 1 and 2 (below). Unsurprisingly, tech-savvy youngsters under 40 have proved to be the earliest adopters.

…m-Health not only increases efficiency but has huge potential to change health-seeking behaviour. This in turn could translate to significant savings for entire healthcare systems. With recent experience in Africa, Jonathan Govender of Bupa sees shifting customers’ behaviour towards trusting mobile interactions as a key challenge. In the UK, Vitality has just launched its new app, ‘Vitality GP’. Time will tell whether we are ready for video chats with our doctors in the UK rather than face-to-face visits. Available to all members, the Vitality app provides direct access to a private GP from home or anywhere, video consultations within 48 hours, calls to doctors 24/7, direct referrals to consultants and delivery of written prescriptions.

…m-Health is increasing provider reach, effectiveness and productivity as much as it enables consumers to move to the centre of the healthcare universe and to receive care more naturally in daily life, whether in emerging or developed markets.

As this relatively young technology matures, generates more insightful data, and comes to be better understood, it may help propel provider and insurance transactions beyond the zero-sum logic that has historically limited options for patients.