Population health analytics for India’s health insurance industry

In India, recent regulatory changes mandating guaranteed renewability, lifetime coverage and restricted premium revision opportunities imply that any substandard risk in the current portfolio could potentially be retained for life. This necessitates a different approach to managing insurers’ growing portfolios.

This article by Milliman’s Lalit Baveja explains how insurers can benefit from treating their covered members using analytics based on population health principles. Such an approach requires a better clinical understanding of member populations to identify the most effective and cost-efficient strategies for managing members’ health and preventing hospitalizations and claims in the long run.

Paid family leave proposal leaves states with funding issues to consider

President Donald Trump’s 2018 budget proposal includes a paid family leave insurance program for workers in the United States. Under the president’s proposal, states would be allowed to design the paid leave program for their own jurisdictions as long as the benefits meet minimum standards. This means that some states may have a lot to consider when preparing for a new insurance program, such as funding methods, administration, and specific benefit design features. The article “Paid family leave in the United States” by Paul Correia offers some perspective.

Level vs. relative premium increases and their effect on actuarial equivalence in long-term care insurance

The long-term care insurance industry continues to look for ways to manage disparities between premiums and costs. Premium increases and benefit reductions are likely to remain major factors in business decision-making. Insurers must carefully consider the impact of rate changes on their bottom line—not just in terms of raw numbers, but in how they relate to experience and the potential for future profits or losses across the spectrum of benefits. Milliman actuaries Mike Bergerson and John Hebig provide some perspective in this article.

This article was originally published in the April 2017 issue of Long-Term Care News.

How would a cure for Alzheimer’s disease change the LTC industry?

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and represents one of the largest long-term care (LTC) insurance risks. What though if Alzheimer’s disease were curable? How would it reshape the LTC industry? Milliman’s Jeff Anderson and Thrivent Financial’s Matt Winegar look at these questions in their article “After Alzheimer’s: What happens to long-term care insurance after a cure?”

IRS announces HSA and HDHP adjusted limits for 2018

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently published Revenue Procedure 2017-37, which provides the inflation-adjusted amounts for health savings accounts (HSAs) for calendar year 2018. The updated limits specify the maximum annual contributions to HSAs that may be tax-deductible, as well as the minimum deductibles and the maximum out-of-pocket expenses allowed under qualifying high-deductible health plans (HDHPs).

The table below reflects the 2018 and 2017 values:

The “catch-up” contribution amount of $1,000 for individuals aged 55 or older was set by law and has not changed since 2009.

Annual out-of-pocket expenses include the HDHP’s deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance, but not premiums paid by plan participants.

Employers that sponsor HSAs and HDHPs should review their programs and communications materials and plan for the updated limits for 2018.

For additional information about the 2018 updated HSA and HDHP limits, please contact your Milliman consultant.

How might healthcare reform 2.0 affect dental care benefits?

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) made pediatric dental care an essential health benefit that issuers must offer on state exchanges. If proposed changes to the ACA are enacted, the dental benefits industry must again determine how to proceed in an evolving landscape. In this paper, Milliman’s Joanne Fontana discusses several key components of the ACA that, if amended or removed, would affect dental benefits. She also provides considerations for dental insurers that can turn another potential round of reform into opportunity.